J & G Antiques
Telephone 631-598-5950 or Email J & G Antiques

CLASSIC DECOY CARVINGS BY DAVID B. WARD
These images are of Ward carvings that have been sold, and may be specially ordered.

  • #4409    Snowy plover      $700.00
  • #4500    Golden Plover by David Ward - A very finely carved golden plover with a rich wet-on-wet blended oil paint.   Price $850.00
  • #4570  Wood Duck by David Ward.  The Wood Duck is a medium-sized duck with the ability to perch in trees.  The elevation can provide some protection from predators.  Wood Ducks generally inhabit wooded swamps, shallow lakes, marshes or ponds.  They usually nest in cavities in trees close to water.  As this carving demonstrates, the Drake Wood Duck has a destinctive beautiful appearance.    $1,400.00
  • #4567   Hawk Owl by David Ward.  The Northern Hawk-Owl has been said to resemble a hawk in appearance and in behavior.  In North America, its appearance in flight is often considered similar to a Cooper’s Hawk.  It is one of the few owls that will search for food both at night and during the daylight hours.
  • #4574     Passenger Pigeon by David Ward. The Passenger Pigeon is an extinct North American bird.  The species lived in enormous migratory flocks until the early 20th century, when hunting and habitat destruction led to its demise.  Some estimate 3 to 5 billion Passenger Pigeons were in United States when Europeans arrived in North America.  The species went from being one of the most abundant birds in the world during the 19th century to extinction early in the 20th century.  $900.00
  • #4573 American Coot by David Ward. The American Coot (mud hen) typically inhabits wetlands and open water in North America. Though commonly mistaken to be ducks, they belong to a separate group. Unlike the webbed feet of ducks, coots have broad, lobed scales on their lower legs and toes that fold back with each step in order to facilitate walking on dry land.
  • #4579 Killdeer by David Ward. Killdeers are a medium sized plover and can be found across the Western Hemisphere. Although they are considered shorebirds, Killdeers often live far from water. Fields, meadows and pastures serve them well. The Killdeer frequently uses a “broken wing act” to distract predators from their nest.
  • #4399 Long-eared Owl
  • #3938 Wigeon Decoy of hollow pine with the head positioned in a dabbling or foraging attitude, slightly turned. Incised wingtips are reminiscent of the amount of detail that Shang Wheeler allowed on his exhibition grade decoys and the pattern is classic Connecticut.
  • #4404    Cork black duck
  • #4575 Hudsonian Curlew by David Ward. The Hudsonian Curlew frequents salt-marshes, muddy shores and inlets. As a wader, with their long bills, they feed on small worms and minute shell-fish. They fly high with great rapidity and at times make a constant sound of whistling. As this carving demonstrates, they are magnificent to observe.
  • #4576 Hudsonian Curlew by David Ward. The Hudsonian Curlew frequents salt-marshes, muddy shores and inlets. As a wader, with their long bills, they feed on small worms and minute shell-fish. They fly high with great rapidity and at times make a constant sound of whistling. As this carving demonstrates, they are magnificent to observes.
  • #4577 Woodcock by David Ward. As their common name implies, woodcocks are woodland birds. They have stocky bodies and long slender bills. Their eyes are located on the sides of their heads, which gives then 360 vision. Unlike most birds, the tip of the bill’s upper mandible is flexible. They feed at night or early evening.
  •  #4493  Preening Pintail
  • #3971  Preening Canadian Goose
  • #4408   Esquimaux Curlew
  • #4360 Eskimo Curlew- At one time, the Eskimo curlew was one of the most numerous shore birds in North America.  They migrated in large groups from South America to the tundra area in North America, for the breeding season. Sadly, in recent years, none have been spotted and they may be extinct.  This rendition of the Eskimo curlew captures the essence of the bird as it once enjoyed its natural habitat.
  • #4401  Whale
  • #4152 Preening Pintail by David Ward. This example of a hollow drake Pintail with inletted wooden tail, a slight crook in the preening neck and subtle feather patterns, truly gives this bird a level of grace rarely achieved. It is just a wonderful piece of sculpture.
  • #4407 Buff breasted sandpiper
  • #4411 Yellowlegs with slightly turned head
  • #4363 Robin - Having a wonderful presence, with a slightly turned head, this bird just captures the appeal of Spring.
  • #4308    Pair of Blue-winged Teal by David Ward - As observed in nature, teal demonstrate grace and beauty. One cannot deny that this pair of decoys does the same.  The peering position of the hen and the slightly turned head of the drake, the raised carving of the wings and the elegance achieved with the paint patterns, contribute to the stunning appearance of this pair of decoys.
  • #4155 Resting Yellowlegs by David Ward. When handling this decoy, one begins to appreciate the subtleness of this bird- the tucked head position and how the head is off set and slightly turned, the full bodied construction, the wonderful paint pattern and texture, the overall attitude of the bird. A bird truly at rest.
  • #4219 Long-eared Owl by David Ward. This species nests in trees by day and hunts in open areas by night. Though widespread and common throughout North America, it is rarely seen in the wild. The bird has the uncanny ability to elongate its body, “freeze,” and blend in with the branches of the tree. This hollow carved example, with its wet-on-wet oil painted surface, truly captures the spirit of the bird.
  • #4312 Peep by David Ward - They are amongst the smallest shorebird and can be found throughout North America. Peep forage on mud flats and eat small crustaceans, insects and snails. Observe the attention to detail in this carving. The turn of the head, the flow of the body, the definitive work on the primary wings, the wet on wet paint patterns - truly a fine example.
  • #4304 Great Horned Owl by David Ward - Native to the Americas, this majestic creature is a solitary bird in the wild. Well camouflaged, it observes its environment from a high tree perch and can fly effortlessly to set upon its prey in near complete silence. This hollow constructed rendition, coupled with the extraordinary use of a wet-on-wet oil base method of painting that David has perfected, truly captures the spirit of the bird.
  • #3594 Pair of Canvasbacks
  • #3675 Pair of Wood Ducks
  • #3676 Drake Blue Winged Teal
  • #3684 Yellowlegs with minnow in throat
  • #3689 Preening Pintail Drake
  • #3698 American Egret - Hollow with snaky neck
  • #3780 Dove
  • #3781 Passenger Pigeon
  • #3783 Standing Pintail
  • #3807 Resting Yellowlegs
  • #4047 Eider - Hollow body with slightly turned head and incised carving on the bill and wing pattern, makes this an outstanding example.
  • #4048 Robin - Having a wonderful presence, with a slightly turned head, this bird just captures the appeal of Spring.
  • Peep (solid construction)
  • #3691 Preening cork black duck
  • #3702 Hollow resting Lesser Yellowlegs
  • #3690 Preening cork black duck with high turned head
  • #3786 Long Eared Owl
  • #3779 Woodcock
  • #3814 Preening Swan
  • #3469a Dowitchers in resting and feeding position.
  • #3512 Eskimo Curlew
  • #3504 Hudsonian Curlew in preening position
  • #3505 Hudsonian Curlew with slightly turned head
  • #3514 Ruddy Tturnstone in resting position
  • #3593 Brant
  • #3621 Preening Dove
  • #3628 A large Loon
  • #3642 Swan
  • #3645 Long Billed Curlew
  • #4110 Dowitcher in Spring plumage
  • #4437   Woodcock
  • #4216    Blue-winged Teal by David Ward - The blue-winged teal is generally the first duck south in the fall and the last to leave for the north in the spring.  They inhabit inland shorelines more often than open water.  In a grazing position as if standing on the shoreline, this wonderful hollow carved decoy demonstrates one aspect of this species behavior.
  • #4572   Ruddy Duck Preener by David Ward.  A unique small duck that appears rather comical in the wild.  Reluctant to fly, the Ruddy Duck will sink below the surface and swim away underwater. Shown in winter plumage and a preening position, this decoy makes a wonderful example of the species.
  • #4400    Sperm Whale plaque by David Ward - A carving of nice proportion and details of the largest of  toothed whales.  By-products from the sperm whale were used for lubricants, oil lamps candles and perfumes.
  • #4306    American Merganser - As with other mergansers, this species has a crest.  However, when the bird is at rest, the crest lies smoothly behind the head.  These fish feeding ducks are expert divers and firmly gripe their prey in their pointed "sawbills."  In this representation, take note of the fine carving and subtle paint patterns. It is a majestic bird in the wild and this decoy captures that attitude.

Click to see other thumbnail panels:
Now Loading

 

David Ward Carvings     Ward Portfolio     Vintage Decoys      Furniture       Accessories  
    About Us     Shows     Links      Home